Live Review: Peace | Redbrick | University of Birmingham

Live Review: Peace

Peace's intimate show at the Sunflower Lounge was a melting pot of deep cuts and fan favourites, Pablo Doyle reviews

In light of Peace’s new album Kindness Is The New Rock And Roll, a homecoming show was destined to be a special one. In collaboration with Jack Daniel’s, all ticket sales would be donated to the Music Venue Trust, a charity created to protect the UK live music network by securing the long-term future of iconic grassroots venues. And what better location to celebrate this than at Birmingham’s legendary Sunflower Lounge.

They say you play The Sunflower Lounge twice in your career, once on your way up and once on your way down… this is our third time playing here
In classic small venue style, Peace take to the stage by walking through the crowd. It’s rare sight for a band who have already released 2 critically acclaimed albums, but it certainly adds a much more personal touch compared to your average arena gig; stood 50 feet away, just about able to make out the silhouette of the artist. ‘They say you play The Sunflower Lounge twice in your career’ – says lead singer Harrison Koisser – ‘once on your way up and another on your way down… this is our third time playing here’. It didn’t seem as if anyone knew what the third time meant, but if the set list was anything to go by, it could only mean something good.

The set opened with ‘Power’ - the second single from their upcoming album. The response was positive as the crowd had clearly already learnt the lyrics; but the real excitement started as they jumped into their older numbers. Leading the charge was ‘Lovesick’ which they hadn’t played live for a few years, followed by ‘Money’ – a 2nd album favourite; and ‘Scumbag’ and ‘Toxic’ – two first album classics.

The highlight of the gig came from ‘1998 (Delicious)’, a ten-minute, mostly instrumental jam consisting of countless drops and chances for the crowd to go crazy. This energy was constant throughout the gig. Surrounded by hardcore fans, crowd-surfing and people going up to the barrier to shake Koissers’ hand was to be expected.

The hooks in songs like ‘From Under Liquid Glass’, ‘Higher Than The Sun’ and ‘California Daze’ make it impossible for you not to throw your hands in the air
As the set progressed, you were constantly reminded of how many good songs they have; some of which translate even better live. The hooks in songs like ‘From Under Liquid Glass’, ‘Higher Than The Sun’ and ‘California Daze’ make it impossible for you not to throw your hands in the air and make your voice all croaky by the end of the gig. They are proper anthems and echo the feeling of singing along to the likes of Oasis or The Courteeners. While songs from the new album like ‘You Don’t Walk Away From Love’ or ‘Kindness Is The New Rock And Roll’ didn’t quite get a great crowd reaction, this is expected for songs which are still finding their place within the Peace set-list. Once the album is out, this is likely to change. But seeing a band like Peace live will always be extremely fun either way.

Polishing off the set with 'Bloodshake', Peace seemed extremely thankful and appreciative towards the crowd for such a warm welcome back. Maybe kindness is the new rock n’ roll?

'Kindness is the New Rock and Roll', the 3rd album from Peace, will be released on 4th May.



Published

19th April 2018 at 3:15 pm

Last Updated

19th April 2018 at 3:17 pm



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