300 Die Without Organs in Birmingham | Redbrick | University of Birmingham

300 Die Without Organs in Birmingham

Recent figures show that more than 300 people have died in the West Midlands in the past 10 years, after not receiving the vital organs for an organ transplant, which could have potentially saved their lives.

It is a preventable national scandal that so many people die waiting for transplants
A total of 302 deaths occurred of people on the transplant list, between 2007/8 and 2016/17. 19 of these deaths occurred in 2016/17. As a result, MPs have started to take action, to prevent these figures rising in the future.

For instance, Geoffrey Robinson MP presented a Private Members’ Bill in the House of Commons on Friday 23rd February; a Bill which aims to change the current organ donation law to an ‘opt-out’ system. Thus, people will automatically be considered an organ donor, unless they opt out of doing so. Robinson states, ‘it is a preventable national scandal that so many people die waiting for transplants when we could give them the gift of life’.

He claims that we have to take action to change the law as despite the, ‘goodwill’ and willingness of people to donate their organs, they merely, ’never get round to signing the register’. The current law states that people have to opt in,
in order to become a donor after their death.

Politicians have the chance to change the law to help all the other kids

The law that MPs wish to impose could still be overruled by family members, should they wish. Yet, England is aiming to follow the footsteps of countries who have already implemented the ‘opt-out’ law, such as Wales, with Scotland set to also follow.

The urge for this law change follows the Mirror’s Change the Law for Life campaign, which claims it is a ‘scandal’ that ‘thousands of patients [are] dying needlessly while waiting for an organ transplant’. The campaign has been encouraging people to contact their local MP’s, to push for the change in current law.

People felt particularly strongly about this issue after hearing of Max Johnson’s story. At just aged 9, Max was waiting for a heart transplant at the Freeman Hospital in Newcastle. After undergoing the transplant, Max is currently well and recovering, and is also calling for MP’s to vote to change the law. He says, ‘Politicians have the chance to change the law to help all the other kids who I left behind in hospital’.

More information on the Mirror's campaign and the steps people can take to help change the current law, can be found here.

second year English Lit student ~ News writer ~ (@sophie_woodley)



Published

21st March 2018 at 9:00 am



Images from

Adrian Pingstone



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