Liar: A Judgement-Questioning Drama | Redbrick | University of Birmingham

Liar: A Judgement-Questioning Drama

Rebecca Garbutt looks at ITV's latest hard hitting drama Liar as it tackles controversial issues

ITV's most intrepid and controversial drama of this autumn is now upon us, in the form of the new drama Liar. It stars Downton Abbey’s Joanne Froggatt as Laura, a schoolteacher who accuses surgeon Andrew (Ioan Gruffudd) of raping her after a dinner-date, when she clearly remembers saying no.

The audience is encouraged to scrap all their preconceived ideas of what really happened
Through the first intense episodes, the audience is encouraged to scrap all their preconceived ideas of what really happened as we are drip fed lies and accusations. In true ITV style, every episode ends up with more revelations and reasons to question the motives of every character.

Whilst I have been enjoying watching this series, especially as I'm a big fan of the two leading actors, the story does seem to be on the unrealistic side (imagine Doctor Foster like stalking) with Laura breaking in to Andrew's house and accidentally leaving her earring, a sign that if she really wanted to change profession she should at least learn to not get caught. Likewise, this drama has the same cringe feeling when looking at the other minor characters. Are these characters based on real people? I've never met anyone who has asked their ex-boyfriend, who they now have a weird "are we more than friends still" relationship with, to break the law.

Liar looks to break down the stereotypes surrounding rape victims and their cries for justice
Cringe fest aside, Liar does look to break down the stereotypes surrounding rape victims and their cries for justice. The writers, brothers Harry and Jack Williams, have previously said their intentions were to tackle these stereotypes in a realistic, but compassionate way. Yet many viewers and charities have accused the ITV show of discouraging real life rape victims from coming forward, as we see Laura’s pushes for any sort of prosecution failing, due to lack of evidence. Perhaps the show’s creators, in dramatising this sensitive subject, have yet to fully realise the enormity of such a sensitive subject.

So, is the show treading in waters that it can't swim in, or is it a brave thing to do, in the hope that victims will feel they are gaining more attention? If you want to decide, Liar reaches its climax on Monday at 9pm on ITV.

 

UOB English and Creative Writing student, who loves TV dramas, music, reading and most importantly cats. When in hibernation, can be found in bed with a good book, curled up with my cat.



Published

13th October 2017 at 9:00 am



Images from

ITV



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