In a satire column, Sam Yearley shares his confusion surrounding the Bake Off and Brexit

Written by Samuel Yearley
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Images by PA

I am tired of seeing headlines every day about the latest news with Brexit being run next to pieces about Bake Off. Why does the media think the people want the largest change in British culture, since the removal of page 3, to be overshadowed by Britain leaving the EU?

What do I care how farmers from Somerset will be affected by Brexit? What’s that got to do with the price of milk? It’s unimportant and it doesn’t affect the common man in any way. And yet, this is the sort of drivel I have to sift through to try and find any story that supports the claim that the Chuckle Brothers might be replacing Mel and Sue. The replacement of Mel and Sue is, for me, the hot button topic. I don’t know how the producers plan on re placing the pair, there is simply no existing duo up to the job. Their perfect blend of wit, base humour, and chin tickling is exactly what the show has needed to offset Paul Hollywood being a massive nob. (And surprise surprise, that problem isn’t going away)

Why does the media think the people want the largest change in British culture, since the removal of page 3, to be overshadowed by Britain leaving the EU?

Stories with theories or speculation about the role interest me, as they should everyone. Yet I keep being steered towards stories about a role that has had no contention around it whatsoever: Foreign Secretary. Boris Johnson has been trusted with the position and as far as I am concerned that is a job well done by Theresa May. The day this country can’t trust Bo Jo to do the job is the day I fall to my knees and weep, weep at the desolation of humanity. So can the media please leave the man alone to work? He will establish us into the global market, get other countries talking about us, and the least we could do is work together as a nation to make sure we can export a high quality next series of The Great British Bake Off.

We’ve never been in a simpler more stable time in terms of government and political parties. I am not suggesting the media stop reporting on them all together, but all that is needed to get an objective and full look at what is going on in the political scene is some shallow, single perspective reports. There’s no need for all the flashy headlines, and various points of view that do nothing but take away precious print space from commemorating the loss of the most wonderful people on British television.

Obviously Hollywood is not included in a part of that.

Article by Sam Yearley

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