The Liberal Democrat conference was held in Glasgow between the 4th and the 8th of October and was the last of the major party conferences. Nick Clegg, leader of the Liberal Democrats, spoke about cutting income tax for 29 million people after the general election if they were in government. He argues this would help students […]

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The Liberal Democrat conference was held in Glasgow between the 4th and the 8th of October and was the last of the major party conferences.

Nick Clegg, leader of the Liberal Democrats, spoke about cutting income tax for 29 million people after the general election if they were in government. He argues this would help students and low tax earners, as they could be lifted out of some tax liabilities. The Liberal Democrats, he said, would also be keen to borrow less than Labour and cut less than the Conservative party has planned to.

Clegg has also outlined policies to tackle mental health issues, an issue that has severely plagued the election campaign toward 2015 for all parties. National waiting time targets will be put in place. People with depression will begin therapy within 18 weeks of diagnosis, as of April. Psychosis diagnosis in young people will be referred on within 14 days, which is the same target that is currently set for patients with cancer.

Cable: 'not losing any sleep’ over unpaid tuition fees in Britain.

Clegg, in his speech, also referred to highlights of the Liberal Democrat record in government. He argued that it was his party that has brought about policy that raised personal tax allowances to £10,500, paternal leave reforms and same-sex marriage.

Vince Cable, business secretary had been quoted as saying that he was ‘not losing any sleep’ over unpaid tuition fees in Britain. The ‘losses’ of money that the government has made will ‘crystallise in 30 to 40 years’ time’, when he is no longer in office. This comes after the government reduced estimates of the amount of tuition fees that will ever be repaid. In his speech, Cable also suggested that Osborne’s plan to cut £25bn out of public spending would also mean another increase in tuition fees in the future would be inevitable.

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