Samsung’s latest model was revealed last month, but is it up to scratch? Roshni Patel tells us her opinion.

Redbrick Gaming Editor, who also occasionally dabbles in the dark arts of other sections. Graduating July 2018
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samsung s6In March we saw the launch of the hotly anticipated Samsung Galaxy S6 at this year’s Mobile World Conference in Barcelona. Samsung released 2 new phones, the Samsung Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge. Both handsets look stunning, as Samsung ditch the tacky plastic shells for sleek designs – a fusion of metal and glass. But, with the S6 looking very similar to S5, is the upgrade really worth it?

The good news is that many of the features you know and love are still there, but have been improved. Samsung have started by upgrading their finger print scanner, opting for a touch scanner instead of the previous swipe to scan. Also to receive a makeover is the user interface, which feels much simpler, with less busy displays and a better use of space. But that’s not all, as the new interface can be customised further with themes, which can even alter the shape and colour of app icons and widgets. The cameras have also been upgraded, sporting 16MP on the rear – double that of the iPhone 6.

the S6 is able to last up to 12 hours on Wi-Fi and 11 hours on 4G

So what’s new? Firstly, the processor, which was built by Samsung, is low power and high-speed. Low power processors make for a much better battery life, so the S6 is able to last up to 12 hours on Wi-Fi and 11 hours on 4G. However, its high level of efficiency has a major drawback; a fixed battery. No longer will you be able to switch in a new battery when the current one dies, as Samsung have followed market trends and locked up their backs. The company hopes that their highly efficient batteries and super-fast charging will combat this negative. Plugging in the S6 for just 10 minutes equates to almost 4 hours of battery life and, with wireless charging capabilities, charging the S6 couldn’t be easier.

But the bad news is that Samsung has forgotten some of their best-loved ideals to compete with Apple’s ever growing sales. From fixed batteries to the removal of SD cards, the S6 has lost many of the qualities that allowed us to differentiate it from the iPhone – qualities that made the handset more affordable and ultimately more desirable.

The Verdict: Price is undoubtedly always going to be a factor and as Samsung move towards fixed memory, the costs have increased significantly. The Edge is set to be priced even higher than the regular S6. However, the new model has worked out many of the kinks and with a faster processor and even faster charging, this could be the battery to surpass all batteries.

 

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