Broad Street bar donates profits to charity after ebola themed event.

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Bar Risa has thrown an ‘Ebola’-themed, student Halloween party. Adverts to promote the student event warned that Birmingham’s nightlife areas had been “infected” by the deadly disease and that the World Health Organisation (WHO) had called for an immediate evacuation to Risa for “decontamination and quarantine.”

The club was decorated with fake biohazard tape and signs declaring it to be a “quarantine area”.  Red paint indicated the club was a “safe zone”, attracting people to enter. Staff, promoters and bartenders were given decontamination suit costumes to wear while club-goers had to walk through a “decontamination tunnel” to get to the club.

Risa has since apologised for the event, explaining that the event was run by an ‘unidentified third party promoter’.

Risa’s Facebook page says that Wednesday nights are ‘I Love Risa’ student nights, which are affiliated with University College Birmingham. A comment by Risa on their Facebook wall before the event read: “I Love Risa is back tonight with a massive Halloween party!! The venue has been designated an infection free zone. The World Health Organisation advises everyone to head to Risa for Decontamination and Quarantine!!”

Risa has since apologised for the event, explaining that the event was run by an ‘unidentified third party promoter’. They are going to organise all profits from the night to be donated to the Doctors Without Borders Charity, to help combat the deadly disease.

The WHO has confirmed that there are at least 5,000 known fatalities of the disease. The most affected countries are Sierra Leone, Guniea and Liberia. However other countries have diagnosed cases of the disease, such as Spain, Nigeria, Mali, Senegal and the USA.

Ebola has no known cure. Vaccine trials have begun, and they hope that a vaccine that has been created to cure Ebola will be available by January 2015, however numbers of how many vaccines will be available constantly change.

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