A major clinical trial led by scientists from the University of Birmingham and the University of Nottingham has suggested that the Mirena coil intrauterine device (IUD) is a better treatment for heavy periods than other conventional methods of treatment. In the trial 571 women, who consulted their GPs for heavy menstrual bleeding, agreed to be […]

Written by Beth Dawson
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A major clinical trial led by scientists from the University of Birmingham and the University of Nottingham has suggested that the Mirena coil intrauterine device (IUD) is a better treatment for heavy periods than other conventional methods of treatment.

In the trial 571 women, who consulted their GPs for heavy menstrual bleeding, agreed to be randomly assigned to the Mirena contraceptive coil or to another standard medical treatment, such as the combined estrogen and progesterone pill and the progesterone only pill.

Over two years, the women assigned the contraceptive coil reported improvements in areas such as physical and psychological health, and practicalities of taking the treatment. Furthermore, the women allocated the contraceptive coil were more likely to continue the treatment after taking it for two years.

This research is in addition to the expanding amount of research which has being carried out as a collaborative effort between individuals from the University of Birmingham and the University of Nottingham.

In September 2012, the two universities launched a £400,000 fund to support joint projects, whilst in March of the same year the two universities received several million pounds in research funding from the Medical Research Council and Arthritis UK to explore reductions of pain and disability caused by aging.

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