Culture Editor Luca Demetriou reviews the free-thinking, boundary-pushing event series He.She.They at Fabric in London, experiencing a rave to remember

Final year English and Drama student
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Images by Gemma Bell

He.She.They returned to Fabric in Farringdon on 24th August, with their free-thinking, boundary-pushing event series, hosting itself in popular dance venues. Merging performance art, fashion, electronic music and freedom, He.She.They returns dance music culture back to its roots. Dance music and its culture were cultivated by queer underground scenes, that resisted labels and had love at its core, spawning from the disco that populated the gay club scene. Through masterful programming, He.She.They create a night to remember, bringing people from all walks of life together in one space, to enjoy themselves.

The event featured Maya Janes Coles, The British-Japanese queen from the electronic underground, a true artist having written, produced, arranged, mixed and engineered every element on most of her tracks (often including the track artwork). Playing in over 40 countries, Maya has the experience and the edge to give Fabric an electrifying experience. With softer, house-influenced rhythms, Maya synthesises hip hop elements with dubbier electronic sounds to create a sonic fantasy in electronic underground music.

It was clear whilst raving, many people were able to let loose, free from the stresses of daily life, and all without prejudice towards other groups

 

Another one of my favourites from the night was Kim Ann Foxman. Heavier than Maya Janes Coles’ style, Foxman blends raw house and emotive techno, drawing in elements from trance into a set that is truly weird and wonderful. Drawing from pop references and inspired by 90s rave scenes of acid house, Foxman defies boundaries of electronic music. With catchy hooks and haunting melodies, dancing freely to Foxman in a room of diverse individuals was magical and exhilarating.  It was clear whilst raving, many people were able to let loose, free from the stresses of daily life, and all without prejudice towards other groups. Everyone was there for the music and atmosphere.

Galvanising the stage, the performers thumped to heavy electronic beats, with fiery energy and a shameless confidence

 A part of this electric atmosphere was the phenomenal performers that rock the stage. From an array of backgrounds and disciplines, these boundary-defying people flip, dip, hiss, kick, kiss and dance, free of boundaries and labels. Hosting for the night was the likes of drag performer Rodent; trans-activist Lucia Blayke, mother of TRANSMISSIONS event and London Trans pride founder, the cabaret sensation Mynxie Monroe and masked club queen, Stella Marbles.  Galvanising the stage, the performers thumped to heavy electronic beats, with fiery energy and a shameless confidence, queering Fabric’s dance space.

 Fashion is also an important aspect to a night at He.She.They, with an open dress policy, from jeans to harnesses, experimentation is encouraged. Initiating the night was Ada Zanditon Couture, presenting her Deity Collection. Showcasing a range of unique garments from her series, a group of performers took the stage during Wax Wing’s sub-bass driven set. Amalgamating hip-hop, techno, trip-hop, trap, dnb, house, UK garage and dark electronica, this hour-long set was dark, deep and soulful. Opening the night with a fashion show is exactly the kind of experimentation that the event series fosters, synthesising multiple artistic disciplines for a truly transcendent night. 

He.She.They will return to the UK in October for Halloween at Motion in Bristol. Get your tickets here

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